#RelentlessAsYou Contest!

You work hard, right? Our newest sponsor, Valent. At Valent, they know what you go through on a daily basis and why you can be described as #Relentless. Some farm until 2am, some all night, through the rain and on a rare occasion, snow, with very little reward. As you begin prep for planting in 2015, be sure to consider why you or a neighbor are relents! Then all you need to do is submit it to win $1,000, for your community!!

Valent wants you to share your story with the world. Be sure to held on over to the Relentless As You website, where you may find all the details

You’re not organic farmers but you don’t grow GMO’s? How do you talk about that?

As part of our “How do you talk about that?,” series, Shannon Seifert shares how she tells the story behind their non-organic and non-GMO farm. 

Not organic and no-GMO’s. Confused? Many are. Orange Patch Dairy doesn’t grow GMO crops, but we’re not an organic farm Non-oganic and non-GMO. How do you talk about that? with Shannon Seifert www.AgChat.orgeither.  With GMO’s in the news, this only increases the importance of communicating about our farming practices. Here are some points we use when talking about GMO’s:

Stress the importance of using crop rotation to control pests and weeds.  We’re conventional farmers, but thanks to a crop rotation which includes forage crops like alfalfa, we haven’t needed to use GMO technologies in our corn varieties.  We basically only grow corn and alfalfa to feed our cows.  Alfalfa works as a great crop to control weeds and break up our corn crop rotations.

Be transparent: when needed, we do use herbicides and insecticides.  We use chemicals as needed, based on the recommendations of our agronomist, but since our crops are fed as forage, we want to minimize the amount of chemicals we use.  We capitalize on the natural defenses of our crops.  However, this can also be said for GMO crops as well, since they allow a reduction in many chemical applications.

GMO’s are an option that we might use if needed.  We could benefit from GMO’s or might use them in the future if we face an issue where our agronomist would recommend them, but for right now, our crop rotation and farming choices don’t require GMO’s.  In the past pests like corn borer, have damaged our crops and lowered our yields, but we’ve been able to use other agronomic tools and rotation to minimize future damage.

Just like consumers, we demand choices.  When we choose our seeds for the growing season, we have a wide variety of traits to choose from: height, grain yield, forage yield, digestibility, drought resistant, standablity, tolerance to insects, resistance to herbicides, etc.  As dairy farmers, we put a strong focus on varieties that will make the best, most digestible feed for our cows first, yield comes second.  If we can grow high quality feed for our cows, we know we will get high quality milk.  A grain farmer will choose varieties that may have a higher grain yield instead; different farmers with different goals.

There’s no single “right” way to farm.  Often we forget that there is no single “right” way to farm.  Each farm has its own environment and a farmer manages and makes choices which are the best for that environment.  We make choices on how to best improve our soils, use our natural fertilizers (cow manure), and produce the most tons of forage per acre, while making sure that each pound of feed we grow helps us grow healthy cows.  We make choices that are the best for our environment and our cows.

Are you a non-GMO and non-organic farmer? How do you talk about your farm?


Shannon Seifert - Visit www.OrangePatchDairy.blogspot.com


Shannon Seifert is a dairy farmer from Southern Minnesota. After working a full time job as a dairy nutritionist for 4 years she returned to the farm in 2009, working side by side with her husband every day. Together they milk around 200 cows. They love what they do and wouldn’t trade it for the world. You can catch up with Shannon on the Orange Patch Dairy Facebook page or on their blog OrangePatchDairy.blogspot.com.


Farmer In the Spotlight – Nicole Small and The County Fair Linky Party

Telling your story is an important piece of agriculture advocacy but its only a piece. What happens to your story if it doesn’t reach your Nicole Small, Tales of a Kansas Farm Mom hosts The County Fair Blog Linky Party each Friday. www.talesofakansasfarmmom.blogspot.com intended audience? It remains an untold story. So how do we get to those audiences? Nicole Small, of Tales of a Kansas Farm Mom and known for her Flat Aggie series, has once again reached into her bag of tricks to develop The County Fair project. We were able to catch up with Nicole to learn more about this new project and how she agvocates.
What is The Country Fair Blog Party and how does it work?
The Country Fair Blog Party (aka Linky Party) is where bloggers can link up 1-3 of their own posts to the party. The links show up on all of the co-hosts blogs. We welcome any topic, but each week we feature the most viewed posts in the following 3 categories: Agriculture, Food, and DIY Projects.
While we don’t award “prizes” we do feature the favorite posts the next week. I know from the experience of being featured on other parties that it can get you 100+ hits on an old post. We try to invite at least 3 non ag bloggers each week to the party. I usually invite newer food blogs. And, we invite newer ag blogs when we find them as well.
How did you come up with the idea for the County Fair? 
I have a pig farmer wife friend who reads lots of blogs.  She kept finding these linky parties that she insisted I participate in.  They really Linky Party on www.talesofakansasfarmmom.blogspot.com helped me reach beyond my friends and family and find a whole new group of followers and bloggers to follow and learn from.
I got to thinking that I needed to try to get some of my ag friends to join in the fun and decided to try one of my own.
How has the County Fair project increased your engagement with non-agriculture folks?

We are still in the infancy of this project, but I keep inviting food bloggers to link up with us each week and I am getting them to link up, but more importantly they are starting to follow me on other outlets so we continue the conversations about how food is raised.
What & how much do you farm?

We raise corn, soybeans, wheat, milo, hay and cow/calf  6000 acres
How long have you been blogging?

I started blogging in March of 2012.
Which social media outlet is your favorite and which is most successful?

I prefer to use Facebook currently, but Pinterest definitely drives the most traffic to my blog.
You are also the founder of the #FlatAggie project. Tell us a little bit about that project and the results as far as reaching non-farm/ranch folks.
I can not take credit for the founding Flat Aggie that does to the Sarah of The House That Ag Built, but she has been excited to watch our Aggie’s as well as her own class’s.  I love this project, because I can get farmers to talk about their farms that wouldn’t normally.  They will write a report for kids with a paper doll, because it isn’t as intimidating as talking with adults.  The funny thing is that so many are so far removed from the farm that often we need to break things down to the kids level for them to be understood.  I can’t tell you how many adults (especially the teachers that sent Flat Aggie out) tell me that they have learned so much from the reports.
It has been a great way for me to get agriculture into 4 classrooms in 2 states (Kansas and California) on a regular basis.  I can work on the reports when I have time and the teachers can present them when they have time.  It is a win win for both of us and the kids love the reports.

Grain Bin Safety Week – 15 Tips to Keep You Safe

1.) Maintain grain quality (e.g. moisture, heat, etc)

2.) Never enter a bin without a “bin entry permit”

3.) Never enter a grain bin unless it is really truly necessary

4.) Never enter a grain bin alone – have an outside observer who can both see and hear you

5.) Most young teens do not have the experience to be your wingman

6.) Time is of the essence – if you’re engulfed, it takes only 90 seconds for you to die

7.) The outside observer needs to have a sure quick method to contact emergency responders in an emergency

8.) Always lockout unloading equipment before entering (so they can’t be turned on by mistake)

9.) Always check oxygen (min 19.5%) and toxic/inflammable gas levels (phosphine CO2 dust etc) before entry

10.) Always always always use secure a lifeline (harness/rope/ladder) for everyone inside

11.) Ensure that there’s adequate lighting inside  People---Group-of-Firefighters Nationwide Agribusiness

12.) The lifesaving tip of last resort = cross your arms in front of your chest if you’re sinking – so that you can breathe

13.) Even during the most frantic times, never every risk your or anyone else’s life with a 5-minute shortcut

14.) Have a written plan for training and rescue

15.) The most important safety tip – train-and-practice often

Grain bin safety is such an important task that no one should take lightly. In addition to the tips above we want to share a fantastic contest with you that is going on now. Nominate your local fire department to win an invaluable grain bin rescue training and the rescue tube, brought to you by Nationwide Agribusiness.

Other great resources:

Learn more about our sponsor Nationwide Agribusiness on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4zOjiKXz6o – and their website.


Unmanned Aerial Systems, You Must Understand the Facts for 2014

This week we’ve been discussing a technology that seems to be rattling the agriculture industry – unmanned aerial systems. We had a Unmanned Aerial Systems - Chad Colby - AgChat.orgfantastic discussion last night during #AgChat on Twitter where we discussed various sub-topics such as types of UAS to the legalities behind the devices. While the technology is becoming more readily available, its important that you understand the facts behind utilizing it. Therefore, we have provided a reference guide to assist you as you make decisions about how you will fit it into your farm or ranch.

reposted from AgTechTalk.com with permission from Chad Colby

One of the most promising new technologies for use in agriculture is Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS).  These systems have the potential for farmers to monitor their crops for problems in a quick and affordable manner. It is very important to understand the facts about this new technology. I continue to hear of farmers planning to hire newly formed UAS companies for 2014, and that my friends is against the law. If a company is offering you a service to provide images or information from a UAS for a fee – it is ILLEGAL.

Many companies in the Agriculture Industry are investing millions to learn how to understand the capabilities of Unmanned Aerial Systems. In the spring of 2014 you can expect lots of expanded research to understand how to measure the vegetative index of a plant to detect issues like disease, nitrogen deficiency, flooding, etc. To do this they will use infrared and thermal camera technology. Colleges and Universities all over the country are also working to help develop programs for students who can support this new industry. The uses for this technology is truthfully unlimited.

Photo credit Chad Colby AgTechTalk.com

Two different aerial systems exist to do this type of data collection. One is a small helicopter with three to four rotors and the other is a small fixed wing airplane. The one you should choose depends on your mission and which systems works best. Honestly, the actual ship is the easy part. The technology already exists to do almost all functions needed to “scout” and get imagery of any field.

The biggest development over the next year or two will be the camera technology used in the systems. Camera designers are currently working to build a camera specifically for UAS. These cameras hold the future of how effective UAS will be in agriculture. It’s easy to get an infrared image, the challenge is to be able to make effective decisions with the data collected. A few weeks ago I saw a new design of a thermal camera, and wow was it impressive. I will be doing some independent testing of cameras in the spring of 2014 and will be reporting back on those.


One of the major reasons I have become outspoken about UAS is because of the lack of knowledge about this topic. There seems to be some serious confusion about the current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. It’s very important if you are considering this application on your farm is to understand the rules. The facts are this simple: If an individual or company flies any unmanned aircraft for commercial use, it’s against the law. Period. You can use a unmanned aircraft for non commercial or private use, provided you operate it correctly as a hobby aircraft.

Chad will be hosting an Unmanned Aerial Systems Training Class on Saturday,
Feb., 15th, 10am-3:30pm at the Asmark AgriCenter in Bloomington, Il.
For additional information contact Chad directly at chadacc@aol.com or 309-361-5564.
written by Chad Colby

Chad Colby - AgTechTalk.com

Beginning at a young age, Chad Colby’s passion revolved around technology. Known as the “tech guy” amongst his friends and family, Chad grew up in Bureau County, IL, where he worked on the family farm. After leaving the farm, he spent several years with a Los Angeles based aviation construction company developing, building, and designing airport hangar projects across the country. During this time, Chad earned his pilot’s license and found a passion for aviation.  He then returned to his roots in Illinois and combined agriculture with aviation to educate farmers and ranchers about the latest technology in the industry.  In 2013, Chad developed AgTechTalk.com to provide readers with the best information pertaining to unmanned aerial systems. As a guest speaker at the 2013 John Deere Global IT Conference he shared his expertise while presenting, “Drones in Agriculture, the Next Phase in Precision Farming.” Most recently he has been involved with Market to Market as well as This Week in Agribusiness’ and travels the country delivering presentations about the latest in precision agriculture. Chad resides in Bloomington, IL  with his wife Karen (partner at McGillicuddy Corrigan Agronomics) and daughter Bristol. Connect with Chad on Twitter: @TheChadColby, by visiting www.AgTechTalk.com or by emailing him at chad@agtechtalk.com.