Why do I agvocate? – Barbara Siemen

We are pleased to bring agriculture advocates a new series called “Why Do I Agvocate?” Often times we can become caught up in the numbers, likes, views, rates and the excitement of social media. We set expectations for ourselves, our blogs, Facebook farm or fan pages and at times become driven by metrics. When the metric benchmarks aren’t achieved we become frustrated or discouraged. 

Some may find success in their stats or metrics expectation. However before many “agvocates” realize it their original reason of “Why Do I Agvocate?” is gone. Social media then potentially becomes a numbers game. Social media should never be about the numbers but the connections and the impacts you make, big or small.

We can forget why we began advocating for agriculture, telling our stories or agvocating, whichever descriptor you prefer. Others may hold certain expectations of what you should be accomplishing in your advocacy journey. In either case, you cannot let that detract you from your original goal of Agvoacy. The hardcore truth is that there’s a high likelihood that at some point we have all fallen to the numbers and expectations. In an effort to bring the ‘why’ back to advocating, we want to share each other’s ‘whys.’ This week we are beginning with Farm Barbie who has a fantastic story behind her ‘why.’

The Why Behind The Chick Wire written by Barbara Siemen

I didn’t grow up in a small town, or even on a farm. My family lived on a beach, with a lake as our front yard. I attended Catholic school. Everything I wanted or needed was within a 20-minute drive. I consider myself a true city-girl at heart, but now I’m living the life of a country-girl complete with cows in my backyard, more tractor traffic down our road than  cars, and straw, random bolts, and other lovely surprises in my washing machine. How did that happen? Love.

I went to Michigan State University as a Criminal Justice major. After spending my high school years involved in my local police department’s Explorer’s Program, I was bound to be an officer. I had respect and admiration for the law and those who uphold it on the streets. I was determined to remove criminals from society. I loved the feel of a Glock in my hand, the weight of Kevlar on my chest, the look of a fresh-pressed uniform, and the scent of the locker room. We had regular monthly meetings and our own uniforms. I went on ride-a-longs every weekend. I knew the LEIN system, proper search procedure, and could take down and cuff a 250-pound man in seconds. I loved it.

One day, Freshman year in South Hubbard Hall at MSU, I was in the cafeteria eating with my friends, decked out in camouflage pants and a white t-shirt, when I spotted him. Fresh from the weight room wearing a white tank top, yellow mesh shorts, and black lifting gloves, he sauntered into the cafeteria like a boss. I pointed him out to my friends. I was in love.

Dorm dates turned into weekend trips “back home” where I spent time alongside him in a tractor, the milking parlor, or at his family’s frequent gatherings. I was in love with him, but I was falling in love with this occupation and his community. I knew I would be with this man for the rest of my life, but being a cop in a small town would be a super tough job. I decided my future family was more important than my own career aspirations, so I changed my major to English, since language was the only other strength I had and loved as much.

After graduation, we married and moved “back home” to where generations of Siemens’ had lived. We live in the same house he grew up in, on the same parcel of land that his family has owned for over 100 years. We continue the family farming tradition with our three children, in the hopes that they will someday carry on the legacy. Though I don’t have a job outside on the farm, I take care of the office stuff and I blog about agriculture as a way to reach consumers. The reason I do it is really all about love.

Darrin works hard, long hours, and puts all our investments in Mother Nature’s hands, hoping to reap a reward in the future. It takes an enormous amount of faith and love to do this every year. After being married for almost 14 years and watching him toil or triumph over and over, his pure love for agriculture has been transported to me. His love is my love, it’s our family’s love, it’s our future love.

On my blog, and across social media, I share various facets of our life. I show readers our daily happenings, so they can see that we are just like them. I share facts about agriculture, so they can understand that we use science and technology in addition to hard work and dedication to provide quality food to them. I offer recipes, so other moms like me can have options for feeding their family, too. I do all of this out of love, and because it also gives me a creative outlet, a purpose in life apart from my husband and kiddos, and a connection to others I wouldn’t otherwise know in life.

As I’ve gotten older, I’ve realized that everyone has struggles and is passionate about something different, which is what makes us all so interesting and unique. A woman that lost her mother to breast cancer might be a prominent voice for breast cancer awareness and research. Someone that has suffered at the abusiveFarm barbie and family hands of a loved one might be a volunteer at a domestic violence shelter. Farmers areno different than anyone else. We are a voice for that thing that we love so much, that thing that has touched our lives and changed us forever. We yearn for the opportunity to reach one more person, to show them our farm, tell them about our animals, to dispel any myths. We get offended when someone questions our intentions or integrity, because we are deeply hurt by the accusation.

I hope through the mirror of their computer screen, readers can see themselves in us; we are human and we make mistakes too. Every day we get up and try our best. We strive and struggle. We conquer and celebrate.
At the end of the day, that thing that makes it all worth it, is love. Farm Barbie is human, and she loves.

 

 

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FarmBarbie

Barbara Ann, also known as The Chick Wire previously known as Farm Barbie, is a city girl turned country chick, thanks to falling in love with a farmer. Now, she’s a stay at home mom and professional farmer’s wife. She is also an amateur photographer, chef, and fashionista and an aspiring children’s book author. Read more about Farm Barbie on her blog, tweet with her @BarbaraSiemen, and follow her on Instagram and Facebook.