Grain Bin Safety Week – 15 Tips to Keep You Safe

1.) Maintain grain quality (e.g. moisture, heat, etc)

2.) Never enter a bin without a “bin entry permit”

3.) Never enter a grain bin unless it is really truly necessary

4.) Never enter a grain bin alone – have an outside observer who can both see and hear you

5.) Most young teens do not have the experience to be your wingman

6.) Time is of the essence – if you’re engulfed, it takes only 90 seconds for you to die

7.) The outside observer needs to have a sure quick method to contact emergency responders in an emergency

8.) Always lockout unloading equipment before entering (so they can’t be turned on by mistake)

9.) Always check oxygen (min 19.5%) and toxic/inflammable gas levels (phosphine CO2 dust etc) before entry

10.) Always always always use secure a lifeline (harness/rope/ladder) for everyone inside

11.) Ensure that there’s adequate lighting inside  People---Group-of-Firefighters Nationwide Agribusiness

12.) The lifesaving tip of last resort = cross your arms in front of your chest if you’re sinking – so that you can breathe

13.) Even during the most frantic times, never every risk your or anyone else’s life with a 5-minute shortcut

14.) Have a written plan for training and rescue

15.) The most important safety tip – train-and-practice often

Grain bin safety is such an important task that no one should take lightly. In addition to the tips above we want to share a fantastic contest with you that is going on now. Nominate your local fire department to win an invaluable grain bin rescue training and the rescue tube, brought to you by Nationwide Agribusiness.

Other great resources:

Learn more about our sponsor Nationwide Agribusiness on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4zOjiKXz6o – and their website.

 

February 25th, 2014 – AgChat on Grain Bin Safety

AgChat on Grain Bin SafetyAre Your Grain Bins Safe? Farms are fun places to be but they have their hazards. Farm equipment, grain bins, and sharp equipment can hurt, even kill people. Being safe is something that requires planning and practice. This AgChat conversion on grain bin safety during Grain Bin Safety Week (#GBSW14 ) looks into what farmers and ranchers are doing to keep people safe at all times.
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February 18th, 2014 – FoodChat on Heart Health Month

FoodChat on Heart Health MonthHealth and Heart, What Are You Doing? February is American Heart Month [CDC info]. This FoodChat looks at what people are doing around food, exercise, health, and life.
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Unmanned Aerial Systems, You Must Understand the Facts for 2014

This week we’ve been discussing a technology that seems to be rattling the agriculture industry – unmanned aerial systems. We had a Unmanned Aerial Systems - Chad Colby - AgChat.orgfantastic discussion last night during #AgChat on Twitter where we discussed various sub-topics such as types of UAS to the legalities behind the devices. While the technology is becoming more readily available, its important that you understand the facts behind utilizing it. Therefore, we have provided a reference guide to assist you as you make decisions about how you will fit it into your farm or ranch.

reposted from AgTechTalk.com with permission from Chad Colby

One of the most promising new technologies for use in agriculture is Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS).  These systems have the potential for farmers to monitor their crops for problems in a quick and affordable manner. It is very important to understand the facts about this new technology. I continue to hear of farmers planning to hire newly formed UAS companies for 2014, and that my friends is against the law. If a company is offering you a service to provide images or information from a UAS for a fee – it is ILLEGAL.

Many companies in the Agriculture Industry are investing millions to learn how to understand the capabilities of Unmanned Aerial Systems. In the spring of 2014 you can expect lots of expanded research to understand how to measure the vegetative index of a plant to detect issues like disease, nitrogen deficiency, flooding, etc. To do this they will use infrared and thermal camera technology. Colleges and Universities all over the country are also working to help develop programs for students who can support this new industry. The uses for this technology is truthfully unlimited.

Photo credit Chad Colby AgTechTalk.com

Two different aerial systems exist to do this type of data collection. One is a small helicopter with three to four rotors and the other is a small fixed wing airplane. The one you should choose depends on your mission and which systems works best. Honestly, the actual ship is the easy part. The technology already exists to do almost all functions needed to “scout” and get imagery of any field.

The biggest development over the next year or two will be the camera technology used in the systems. Camera designers are currently working to build a camera specifically for UAS. These cameras hold the future of how effective UAS will be in agriculture. It’s easy to get an infrared image, the challenge is to be able to make effective decisions with the data collected. A few weeks ago I saw a new design of a thermal camera, and wow was it impressive. I will be doing some independent testing of cameras in the spring of 2014 and will be reporting back on those.

 

One of the major reasons I have become outspoken about UAS is because of the lack of knowledge about this topic. There seems to be some serious confusion about the current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. It’s very important if you are considering this application on your farm is to understand the rules. The facts are this simple: If an individual or company flies any unmanned aircraft for commercial use, it’s against the law. Period. You can use a unmanned aircraft for non commercial or private use, provided you operate it correctly as a hobby aircraft.

Chad will be hosting an Unmanned Aerial Systems Training Class on Saturday,
Feb., 15th, 10am-3:30pm at the Asmark AgriCenter in Bloomington, Il.
For additional information contact Chad directly at chadacc@aol.com or 309-361-5564.
written by Chad Colby
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Chad Colby - AgTechTalk.com

Beginning at a young age, Chad Colby’s passion revolved around technology. Known as the “tech guy” amongst his friends and family, Chad grew up in Bureau County, IL, where he worked on the family farm. After leaving the farm, he spent several years with a Los Angeles based aviation construction company developing, building, and designing airport hangar projects across the country. During this time, Chad earned his pilot’s license and found a passion for aviation.  He then returned to his roots in Illinois and combined agriculture with aviation to educate farmers and ranchers about the latest technology in the industry.  In 2013, Chad developed AgTechTalk.com to provide readers with the best information pertaining to unmanned aerial systems. As a guest speaker at the 2013 John Deere Global IT Conference he shared his expertise while presenting, “Drones in Agriculture, the Next Phase in Precision Farming.” Most recently he has been involved with Market to Market as well as This Week in Agribusiness’ and travels the country delivering presentations about the latest in precision agriculture. Chad resides in Bloomington, IL  with his wife Karen (partner at McGillicuddy Corrigan Agronomics) and daughter Bristol. Connect with Chad on Twitter: @TheChadColby, by visiting www.AgTechTalk.com or by emailing him at chad@agtechtalk.com.

 

 

February 11th, 2014 – AgChat on Drones, UAVs, and Toys?

AgChat on Drones, UAVs, and ToysWhat is the value of UAVs in Agriculture? UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) and UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) are the rage in many industries. In agriculture it is a tool that can help scout fields and assess crops. But the regulations are murky. What are farmers and ranchers allowed to do and when will the US catch up to what other countries are allowing their citizens to do? This AgChat on Drones, UAVs, and Toys highlights some of the thoughts.
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